Understanding US Soccer’s Mandate for Birth Year Registration and Small-Sided Games

US Soccer and US Club Soccer's Mandate for Youth Soccer Development - Black Oaks Youth Soccer Club - Santa Rosa, California

Many of you may have heard about changes afoot for US Club Soccer in partnership with US Soccer, which manages national team soccer in this country. The changes involve switching age registration from school year to birth year, which aligns the US with the rest of the world.  Also, for ages 12 and under there will be smaller sided games to allow players more space and more touches on the ball. Read more of this post

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[POLL] Are Small Sided Games Good for US Soccer?

Competitive youth soccer leagues are holding more small sided games and opinions have been mixed whether this is effective for youth soccer development.

This spring NorCal Premier Soccer has implemented a 5v5 play-date structure (4v4 plus a goalie) up to age eight as opposed to the traditional 8v8.  Furthermore plans are being discussed to keep 8v8 up to the age of 12.

Some don’t agree with the new format.  It’s not real soccer they argue, the fields are too small, the ball goes out all the time, among many other reasons. Proponents give their own reasons why it develops better-rounded soccer players.  It gives them more touches on the ball and they can be more creative while both scoring and defending more. What do you think? Answer our survey and leave your opinion below:

Soccer America: Parents buy in to ‘Silent Soccer’

silent soccer saturday youth santa rosa black oaks

Shhhhhh – Give the kids a break.

Southwest Ohio Youth Soccer met some parent resistance when it announced a “silent soccer weekend” in which parents were restricted to clapping. “We were a little unsure at first how we as parents were going to keep quiet and not cheer on our children,” said Amy Forte, a Thunder United Metro FC parent. “But when our son told us he absolutely loved it and wished they would do it more often, we were sold.”

Her son, 11-year-old Drew Forte, 11, said, “I could hear and communicate with my teammates and not have parents tell them what to do.”

Coaches were instructed to pull noisy parents aside for a talking to.

Read the original story…