CODE OF CONDUCT

NOTE: All coaches, players and guardians will be required to sign this agreement to adhere to the club’s code of conduct.

Soccer players shaking handsCOACHES/PLAYERS

  • Play the game for the game’s sake.
  • Be generous when you win.
  • Be gracious when you lose.
  • Obey the rules of the game.
  • Accept the decisions of the officials.
  • Work for the good of the team.
  • Conduct yourself with honor and dignity.
  • Applaud the efforts of your teammates AND your opponents.

SPECTATORS

  • Children have more need for the good example than criticism.
  • Make athletic participation for your child, and others, a positive learning experience.
  • Attempt to relieve the pressure of competition, not increase it.
  • Be courteous to the officials and coaches. The coaches are giving their time, energy, and money.
  • Applaud good play of players on either team.
  • Do not question the judgment or honesty of any official.
  • Accept the results of each game and teach your child to learn good sportsmanship.

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Meet the Pioneers of Black Oaks Youth Soccer

Black Oaks Soccer Coaches

Louie Chambrone and Luis Martinez

Meet the two Lou’s, Black Oaks Lou Chambrone and Luis Martinez.  Back in 2003 a youth soccer program was just a dream for the Black Oaks, but Luis and Louie also had a dream to coach soccer.

From 2003 to 2009, under the Black Oaks name, the two Lou’s volunteered as coaches and assistant coaches for several competitive boys soccer teams from Laguna Youth Soccer and later Santa Rosa South Soccer league. Luis Martinez started in 2003 working as an assistant coach at the Santa Rosa Junior College because he was inspired by other members of the Black Oaks to go into coaching.  He was offered an opportunity to volunteer as head coach for a Laguna travelling boys team and Chambrone joined later that season.  They called themselves the Laguna Black Oaks.

“We never turned anyone away.” – Listen to Minicast

The two friends sparked a chemistry with their team, using a coaching style typical to older teams with strict discipline, teamwork and a lot of running.  They say the boys responded well to the regimented training sessions and the parents appreciated the character it built in their boys.  The results showed.  The team won the local Class 3 league in 2004 and success continued with four subsequent seasons. Martinez acknowledged the support and encouragement of Adolpho Mendoza, technical director for Atletico Santa Rosa, a rival club in Santa Rosa.

Chambrone continued coaching, his U12 team losing in the State Cup semi-finals in 2009.  He is proud that some of the Black Oaks have gone on to play at the Santa Rosa Junior College, including Diego Leon and Danny Chapparo. One player Luis Luna, because of all the running at practice, became a star Cross-Country runner and earned a full scholarship to UC Berkeley.

Now these two are out of coaching and looking forward to playing.  They both have new families and say they are looking forward to coaching again when they have children.  But their dream has been kept alive by parents and younger siblings of the Black Oaks… but that’s the next chapter.

The Black Oaks would not exist were it not for the volunteer work of many too numerous to name, those like Luis Martinez and Louie Chambrone.  The club is recruiting new players and coaches.  If you love soccer or have a talent you wish to share in making a difference for young soccer players, join us.  Volunteer today!